ABOUT ME
Neurotic Visionary with Delusional Aspirations. 08/20/1995. Male. Canada. Or am I?

#MY FACE

#MY ART

#MY REVIEWS
October 20th 2014 12:55 AM  |  97,648 notes  |  Source  |  Via
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"I enjoy controlled loneliness. I like wandering around the city alone. I’m not afraid of coming back to an empty flat and lying down in an empty bed. I’m afraid of having no one to miss, of having no one to love."

—  

Kuba Wojewodzki, Polish journalist and comedian 

I like the term ‘controlled loneliness.’ It makes sense to me. It implies that there exists an ‘uncontrollable loneliness’ which we experience perhaps irrationally and unexpectedly; and if a person can’t distinguish between the controlled and the uncontrollable, why and how a person could simultaneously enjoy solitude and loathe it, becomes problematic and irreconcilable.

October 17th 2014 5:11 AM  |  6 notes
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I believe that the world is full of infinite possibilities.

Everything had an infinite number of outcomes, and the future does too.

Atoms and bonds didn’t have to behave the way they do; they just did and they formed galaxies, planets, and human bodies; language didn’t have to sound the way it does and have meaning the way it does; we defined it and continue to define it; every concept originates essentially from nothing—nothing, in itself, is just an English word that represents something that the human mind thought up, and why the mind thought this word would suit this made up concept of nothing, essentially originates from seemingly nowhere, doesn’t it? 

There is a grand, unsolvable mysticism when you start to think about life like that. How serendipitous everything is, given the circumstances for infinite possibilities. 

And it’s the only reason I keep myself alive, because even after I think about killing myself, I can imagine myself being, just maybe, one of infinite possibilities; to be someone who can be content and cope with solitude and sadness. To be an entity that transcends the human biological laws of brain chemistry which control our happiness. I can be him for one more second. 

And then it’s back on planet Earth, where my body is a function of my brain, my heart, and all the organs held between my bones and my skin, and I remember that if I am to be confined into this time, this dimension, and this reality, then I will spread love and compassion, and I will remind myself that being sad is okay, but that I need to be happy too.

October 15th 2014 2:25 AM  |  6 notes
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I identify with femininity and I identify with women—both in my life and those I’ve read about—and if there ever comes a day when we can eradicate the notion of gender, the concept of this binary that intrinsically sees women as feminine and men as masculine, I’d gladly stop calling myself a ‘male’, because the delusional privilege of a male gendered performance, which men have internalized so as to feel entitled to this privilege that is slowly but surely eroding, has engendered nothing but violent abuse and abhorrent mistreatment of women, to put it lightly. 

Women should have the fundamental right and freedom to be just as assertive, independent, educated, and sexually expressive as men, without being somehow erased of her femininity—these are not inherently male (read masculine) oriented qualities; they are perpetuated as such so that men can continue to oppress women and more broadly, females.

WHILE I’M AT IT, I THINK WOMEN SHOULD HAVE THE FUNDAMENTAL RIGHT TO LIVE THEIR LIVES WITHOUT HAVING TO FEAR 1. BEING PHYSICALLY OR SEXUALLY ASSAULTED, 2. BEING RAPED, AND 3. HAVING TO BE MURDERED, ALL BECAUSE THEY ARE JUST WOMEN.

I AM TIRED OF COWARDLY MEN WHO WRITE SNIDE BULLSHIT AND THROW HISSY FITS AND DECIDE TO FUCKING EXACT MURDER BECAUSE WOMEN FINALLY HAVE SOME LIBERTIES. 

Gender is a social construct and as far as I am concerned it is a detrimental one.

October 4th 2014 12:53 AM  |  6 notes
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October 3rd 2014 11:32 PM  |  3 notes
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I was flipping through the Fortune magazine cover article on Peter Thiel, and I stumbled upon a short paragraph that revealed he was gay, which for some childish reason made me grin. It’s reassuring to know that gay men and women can be powerful and successful—although I had no doubt that they could be—but also not have their sexuality be the headline. The familiar coming out narrative of struggle and acceptance can be necessary, but it’s nice to have stories where one’s sexuality is not the primary focus, but also is not ignored; it’s important to see the nuance in people’s lives (and also portray it in the media), and not as merely a blank representation of the absurd dichotomy between gay and straight that society has made up. 

October 3rd 2014 2:38 AM  |  3 notes
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I love the way Fincher’s films (at least his recent three at least) make me so inspired and passionate about film all over again. They’re also so great that I want to try and convince as many people to see it, because their stories are just that insane or well written. 

On another note, I’m consistently forgetting words that were just in my head, as I’m about to type them and I’m starting to get worried about why I seem to be having trouble recalling names and stuff, but it could just be my whack sleeping. Or I don’t know. 

October 3rd 2014 2:31 AM  |  3 notes
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Gone Girl, dir. David Fincher (2014)
Fincher’s auteurism continues to expand in the way of shrewd adaptations—his last two, The Social Network (2010) and The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (2011), were brooding, brilliant, intense dramas, and all around critically lauded films. They could be described as crazy good, and that couldn’t be truer for Gone Girl; in fact it is the zenith of insanity. And in every aspect of filmmaking, it is phenomenal. Gillian Flynn, in adapting her own novel for the screenplay, implements a pedantic narration between past and present, between two opposing characters, and between subjectivity and objectivity. It’s a chaotic propulsion that moves these characters forward at such a precise pace and with such enigmatic force. 
It goes without saying that the filmis bolstered by a tremendous cast. Rosamund Pike plays Amy Dunne, the Gone Girl in question, with such deliberate nuance and clarity—like Fincher’s previous leads, Jesse Eisenberg and Rooney Mara, Pike could reap substantial nominations come awards season. But she is also supported by a no less impressive performance by Ben Affleck, as Nick Dunne, the man under suspicion for the disappearance of his wife. Beyond that simple tagline, Gone Girl remains a film that needs to be seen.
And what this story is, is by and large a satirization of the media’s crime coverage—our obscene obsession with sensationalized narratives of victims and aggressors, death and tragedy—but perhaps an even larger satirization of the notion of marriage and commitment (or lack thereof). It is by some accounts, a deeply disturbing black comedy about how far we might go to survive our quote unquote commitment, which might instead, truly be sociopathic and psychopathic. In a twisted way, Gone Girl elicits laughter, but also grimaces and gasps.
Gone Girl is undoubtedly another masterpiece by Fincher and company. Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross are back to score, Trish Summerville on costume design, and Jeff Cronenweth oversees cinematography; a team of artists that have solidified a distinct style, a confluence of colours, sounds, and fabrics which mesh so well and punctuate the mood and breathe life into the characters on screen. Reznor and Ross have orchestrated yet another soundtrack that builds palpable tension and accompanies the narrative structure so well, as to be integral to the storytelling. The same could be said for Summerville’s polished clothing choices and the transformative nature of the makeup. 
Gone Girl is an enthralling, dizzying two and a half hours. Gone Girl like Fincher’s previous efforts, is impossibly cinematic.

Gone Girl, dir. David Fincher (2014)

Fincher’s auteurism continues to expand in the way of shrewd adaptations—his last two, The Social Network (2010) and The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (2011), were brooding, brilliant, intense dramas, and all around critically lauded films. They could be described as crazy good, and that couldn’t be truer for Gone Girl; in fact it is the zenith of insanity. And in every aspect of filmmaking, it is phenomenal. Gillian Flynn, in adapting her own novel for the screenplay, implements a pedantic narration between past and present, between two opposing characters, and between subjectivity and objectivity. It’s a chaotic propulsion that moves these characters forward at such a precise pace and with such enigmatic force. 

It goes without saying that the filmis bolstered by a tremendous cast. Rosamund Pike plays Amy Dunne, the Gone Girl in question, with such deliberate nuance and clarity—like Fincher’s previous leads, Jesse Eisenberg and Rooney Mara, Pike could reap substantial nominations come awards season. But she is also supported by a no less impressive performance by Ben Affleck, as Nick Dunne, the man under suspicion for the disappearance of his wife. Beyond that simple tagline, Gone Girl remains a film that needs to be seen.

And what this story is, is by and large a satirization of the media’s crime coverage—our obscene obsession with sensationalized narratives of victims and aggressors, death and tragedy—but perhaps an even larger satirization of the notion of marriage and commitment (or lack thereof). It is by some accounts, a deeply disturbing black comedy about how far we might go to survive our quote unquote commitment, which might instead, truly be sociopathic and psychopathic. In a twisted way, Gone Girl elicits laughter, but also grimaces and gasps.

Gone Girl is undoubtedly another masterpiece by Fincher and company. Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross are back to score, Trish Summerville on costume design, and Jeff Cronenweth oversees cinematography; a team of artists that have solidified a distinct style, a confluence of colours, sounds, and fabrics which mesh so well and punctuate the mood and breathe life into the characters on screen. Reznor and Ross have orchestrated yet another soundtrack that builds palpable tension and accompanies the narrative structure so well, as to be integral to the storytelling. The same could be said for Summerville’s polished clothing choices and the transformative nature of the makeup. 

Gone Girl is an enthralling, dizzying two and a half hours. Gone Girl like Fincher’s previous efforts, is impossibly cinematic.

September 26th 2014 11:17 PM  |  953 notes  |  Via
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"We’re all lonely for something we don’t know we’re lonely for. How else to explain the curious feeling that goes around feeling like missing somebody we’ve never even met?"

—  David Foster Wallace
September 26th 2014 8:46 PM  |  21,056 notes  |  Via
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amajor7:

straight men: how do they work?

Isn’t that the million dollar question. #idontknowhowtotalktostraightguys
#idontknowhowtotalktoguysatall

amajor7:

straight men: how do they work?

Isn’t that the million dollar question. #idontknowhowtotalktostraightguys

#idontknowhowtotalktoguysatall

September 26th 2014 1:04 AM  |  2 notes  |  Source
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Just A Little Bit of Your Heart / Ariana Grande

I know I’m not your only, but at least I’m one
I heard a little love is better than none