ABOUT ME
Neurotic Visionary with Delusional Aspirations. 08/20/1995. Male. Canada. Or am I?

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July 21st 2014 2:42 AM  |  20 notes  |  Via
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soundonsight:

Fantasia 2014: ‘Boyhood’ transcends one life
When a filmmaker perfectly aligns the technical and the artistic, we’re reminded of the transformative power of cinema. Lost amid the genre clichés and computer-generated extravaganzas lies an expansive battlefield called ‘the human condition’, where moments of great power co-mingle with insignificant monotony to shape our lives. Boyhood depicts these moments with startling honesty and grace, bereft of casual judgment or detached irony. It is a meditation on everything and nothing; an acknowledgement that despite the pain and confusion, we’re going to be okay. Because, really, what other choice do we have?
Click here to expand the article 

Here’s a more eloquent review.

soundonsight:

Fantasia 2014: ‘Boyhood’ transcends one life

When a filmmaker perfectly aligns the technical and the artistic, we’re reminded of the transformative power of cinema. Lost amid the genre clichés and computer-generated extravaganzas lies an expansive battlefield called ‘the human condition’, where moments of great power co-mingle with insignificant monotony to shape our lives. Boyhood depicts these moments with startling honesty and grace, bereft of casual judgment or detached irony. It is a meditation on everything and nothing; an acknowledgement that despite the pain and confusion, we’re going to be okay. Because, really, what other choice do we have?

Click here to expand the article 

Here’s a more eloquent review.

July 21st 2014 2:38 AM  |  0 notes
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jameswerty replied to your post “As another side note, I think Game of Thrones has officially…”

I totally had this! Apparently Lorelei (Samantha) wanted her character killed off as she didn’t want to film it anymore at one point. I couldn’t have coped with that.

Now see, a death request would probably be easily granted in Game of Thrones haha. I’m pretty sure their brilliant writers could write off anyone and make it believable and part of the meticulous plot.

I’m glad no one in the film died though. The film succeeds in being a film that to a relative extent reflects most middle class, North American, suburban family lives (though inevitably there are some American/White cultural undertones that I couldn’t relate to personally but could recognize from media/films/television). It meanders, though never monotonous, and there’s no apex full of tragedy, and conversely there’s not much of conclusion. I really believe it’s a film that could go on forever, because life (when written and edited so well) is so interesting observed from afar (and of course, living your own life is as well, or should be!).

July 20th 2014 12:28 AM  |  4 notes
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As another side note, I think Game of Thrones has officially brainwashed my mind.

At some points of Boyhood I found myself sitting in fear that at any moment somebody was going to die. Like anybody. Somebody was definitely going to die. That bully is totally going to kick his face off; he is going to crash; somebody’s definitely going to die in ten seconds and I’m going to be devastated.

July 19th 2014 11:30 PM  |  3 notes
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And as a side note about Boyhood, there was a moment when the daughter was watching the Telephone video (she was also listening to LoveGame in 2009!) and it was such a moment of… victory? Not victory, but for lack of a better word, it felt right in a film that was about moments in our lives and one that mirrored the culture of the 2000s. For better or for worse, Gaga changed the landscape of Pop in such drastic ways with her videos, her fashion, and her music, all of which were constantly statements. That video in particular was an event for many of her fans (which I’m guessing the actress was, since much of the film was an approximate reflection of the lives of the cast). And in regards to the video, her step-mom asks her if her mom allows her to watch these videos, and she proudly says that her mom does, and she likes them too. Cause they get it. And I’m assuming, as a parent, her mom gets it. Any perceived shock value or theatricality was never done in hopes that people would replicate it, but was an attempt to liberate people to do something just as bold in their own capacity and in their own passions. She is her own expression, and you can be your own. And above all, there’s always a bit of humour and light heartedness in her art, or an aspect that translates into something serious.

Anyway Boyhood was life changing and you should all see it if you have the chance to.

July 19th 2014 11:09 PM  |  8 notes
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Boyhood, dir. Richard Linklater (2014)
Much like the essence of life, Boyhood is a sprawling 12 year story full of little moments—and how fitting that for the audience, this film is but a moment of our lives? Nothing short of immaculate and monumental, Boyhood is an intimate portrait of growing up, growing old, and the ebb and flow of change that transforms us into the people we are in this moment, all in relativity to the grand scheme of moments that make up our lives. Linklater’s trademark naturalism and conversational voyeurism is nowhere more consummate and moving than in Boyhood, a film that captures the culture and history that surrounds the recent decade, because it was filmed gradually throughout the 2000s. Hairstyles change, clothing changes, technology advances, music changes, and those seemingly insignificant, fleeting “things” (more or less), become a signifier and reflection of times. They demarcate moments, events, and cultural shifts, in retrospect. 
And that’s only gazing upon the generality of the overall narrative. Boyhood is a cinematic masterpiece (it truly is) that has so many moments, and has so much to say about life. People enter and leave our lives; our simplest of words can change lives; and throughout our lives we learn from an immeasurable number of experiences, and are influenced by countless people. Every family has their own struggle. And every day is a step toward the future, and then we perish. But before we do, each of our lives is filled with moments, whether we acknowledge them as such or not, whether we remember them or not. Watching this family—a boy, his older sister, and their childhood between divorced parents—mature on screen, physically and emotionally, career wise and in all dimensions of their relationships (with teachers, friends, new families, and new romances), is humbling. In just under three hours, it encapsulates the ephemerality of life. Life moves on no matter what. 
Boyhood is a fascinating study of character and identity, family and life, and it’s a cinematic and narrative achievement that will stand as a remarkable film for generations of audiences.
FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them!

Boyhood, dir. Richard Linklater (2014)

Much like the essence of life, Boyhood is a sprawling 12 year story full of little moments—and how fitting that for the audience, this film is but a moment of our lives? Nothing short of immaculate and monumental, Boyhood is an intimate portrait of growing up, growing old, and the ebb and flow of change that transforms us into the people we are in this moment, all in relativity to the grand scheme of moments that make up our lives. Linklater’s trademark naturalism and conversational voyeurism is nowhere more consummate and moving than in Boyhood, a film that captures the culture and history that surrounds the recent decade, because it was filmed gradually throughout the 2000s. Hairstyles change, clothing changes, technology advances, music changes, and those seemingly insignificant, fleeting “things” (more or less), become a signifier and reflection of times. They demarcate moments, events, and cultural shifts, in retrospect. 

And that’s only gazing upon the generality of the overall narrative. Boyhood is a cinematic masterpiece (it truly is) that has so many moments, and has so much to say about life. People enter and leave our lives; our simplest of words can change lives; and throughout our lives we learn from an immeasurable number of experiences, and are influenced by countless people. Every family has their own struggle. And every day is a step toward the future, and then we perish. But before we do, each of our lives is filled with moments, whether we acknowledge them as such or not, whether we remember them or not. Watching this family—a boy, his older sister, and their childhood between divorced parents—mature on screen, physically and emotionally, career wise and in all dimensions of their relationships (with teachers, friends, new families, and new romances), is humbling. In just under three hours, it encapsulates the ephemerality of life. Life moves on no matter what. 

Boyhood is a fascinating study of character and identity, family and life, and it’s a cinematic and narrative achievement that will stand as a remarkable film for generations of audiences.

FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them!

July 19th 2014 12:59 AM  |  18,022 notes  |  Source  |  Via
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It makes absolutely no sense that I love the empowerment of Valar Morghulis (in the sense that Daenerys implies here) when I am a man myself, but then again I’ve always been empowered by the strength of women rather than that of men.

July 19th 2014 12:42 AM  |  0 notes
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Airbnb’s rebranded logo isn’t quite new, and its liabilities are under vilification by NYC tenants

:/

In regards to the latter article, I do have to admit the ads seem disingenuous—a bit like a pamphlet for an adult nursing home. We no longer live in a commercial setting where ads thrive by telling us why its product or service would be great (or in Airbnb’s case, why it already is great, but apparently not); we need to hear about it socially, and it has to be demonstrated by people we trust. That, or the marketing has to go viral somehow. 

And so, how do you sell a service that, to some inevitable extent, diminishes the safety of your home—your personal, private, sanctuary—and in NYC’s case, the safety of your fellow neighbours? Or rather, how do you work through the many legal obligations and liabilities to ensure that your company can protect the safety of your customers’ homes (and the well being of the visitors who live with the hosts)? 

I don’t know, psht, but I’m hoping Airbnb is working it out quickly because it does seem like a cool way of staying in a foreign place.

(Some people are also saying the new logo looks like a vagina or a butt. I see the butt. And the butthole. :/ )

July 17th 2014 11:59 PM  |  5 notes
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We speak of the Malaysian Airline with concerned speculation as an intentional attack from Ukraine or Russia. And the conflict between Israel and Palestine wages on; bombs destroying the country.

And then people just become numbers. Casualties of a war is what they are in the news.

People listening and reporting have forgotten that people, with lives connected to others, were on board that airplane; lived on those lands. And for the vindictive regimes that shoot from afar, those people are faceless, but more unfathomably, they are meaningless to them.

How terrifying is it to know that nothing in your entire being, not even an iota of your humanity, can dissuade a man from firing a bullet, or dropping a bomb, on you and the people you love? And how upsetting is it to realize that the tragedy of your death will merely become a debate of politics and contention between countries? And then how sad is it that it becomes the way of the world. Life just is. We can’t mourn for too long or the world would stop turning.

July 17th 2014 11:38 PM  |  2 notes
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"War had been literally continuous, though strictly speaking it had not always been the same war."

—  George Orwell, 1984
July 17th 2014 12:09 AM  |  5 notes
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