ABOUT ME
Neurotic Visionary with Delusional Aspirations. 08/20/1995. Male. Canada. Or am I?

#MY FACE

#MY ART

#MY REVIEWS
September 17th 2014 11:23 PM  |  2 notes
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A Second Chance, dir. Susanne Bier (2014)
European films, from what I have gathered (and correct me if I’m wrong), can be characterized as being essentially realist to a fault, and yet their stories still manage to surprise, shock, and titillate its audience—largely in part because of its realist nature itself and what these stories resonate about human life. 
A Second Chance is a moral drama that is at the intersection of mental health and maternity, and beyond that I don’t want to say too much in fear of spoiling the story that unravels, which is thrilling and tense upon initial viewing. Its trailer simplifies much of the complexity and ambiguity that ensues; it’s much more than a drama of socioeconomic class and child neglect, though those are rampant themes. The film touches on a situation I personally have never encountered or heard of, and while I wish it delved more deeply into the psychology of its characters, its enigma and withholding of information is perhaps why it succeeds. 
Bier also has some beautifully composed shots that complement the film’s somber tone and an effortless performance by Nikolaj Coster-Waldau.
FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them!

A Second Chance, dir. Susanne Bier (2014)

European films, from what I have gathered (and correct me if I’m wrong), can be characterized as being essentially realist to a fault, and yet their stories still manage to surprise, shock, and titillate its audience—largely in part because of its realist nature itself and what these stories resonate about human life. 

A Second Chance is a moral drama that is at the intersection of mental health and maternity, and beyond that I don’t want to say too much in fear of spoiling the story that unravels, which is thrilling and tense upon initial viewing. Its trailer simplifies much of the complexity and ambiguity that ensues; it’s much more than a drama of socioeconomic class and child neglect, though those are rampant themes. The film touches on a situation I personally have never encountered or heard of, and while I wish it delved more deeply into the psychology of its characters, its enigma and withholding of information is perhaps why it succeeds. 

Bier also has some beautifully composed shots that complement the film’s somber tone and an effortless performance by Nikolaj Coster-Waldau.

FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them!

September 17th 2014 9:22 PM  |  20,792 notes  |  Source  |  Via
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vinegod:

How to leave an awkward situation by Katie Ryan

The hardest I’ve laughed in a long time.

September 17th 2014 9:05 PM  |  685 notes  |  Via
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Tony Bennett & Lady Gaga - ‘Nature Boy’

Tony Bennett and Gaga’s new jazz record “Cheek To Cheek”, available September 23rd, is now available for pre-order here!

The greatest thing you will ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return.

September 16th 2014 11:37 PM  |  3 notes
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The Voices, dir. Marjane Satrapi (2014)
In Marjane Satrapi’s fourth directorial feature, she imbues this deeply disturbed black comedy surrounding a man living with schizophrenia (played by Ryan Reynolds) with her signature comic visual style and stark visual palette. While it deals with a heavy character background of mental breakdown and abuse, its humour derives from a parody of language and filmic conventions, rather than the serious subject itself. 
The eponymous voices are Ryan Reynolds himself, who voices the psychotic manifestations of Jerry Hickfang, an outwardly cheery, if not amiable average joe. His cat and his dog become his guiding subconscious after a date gone awry that ends with his workplace crush beheaded and living in animated fashion (as part of a delusion of course) in his fridge. Glimpses of his turbulent childhood living with a mentally ill mother, while being ill himself, flesh out the damaging assault by his father, and his alienation within his own family. These moments are tense and frightening—a tonal departure—but nevertheless significant in building a sympathetic character whose violence is necessarily born out of his uncontrollable mind. 
Satrapi also plays very well with the concept of perception—portraying subjective (through Jerry’s eyes) and objective settings, and perhaps even subjective and objective personalities. Although, the story perpetuates a harmful stereotype of violent behaviour among those who live with mental disorders (which is simply untrue), he is not absolved of asking philosophical questions about his existence; his tortured existence which has made him unwillingly violent. By the end, with a winning musical number, Jerry is seen as a product of a society that is still reluctant and unsure of how to speak about mental illness. And the reverberations of this means lives suffer, though not nearly in such a zany and redeeming manner as The Voices. 
FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them!

The Voices, dir. Marjane Satrapi (2014)

In Marjane Satrapi’s fourth directorial feature, she imbues this deeply disturbed black comedy surrounding a man living with schizophrenia (played by Ryan Reynolds) with her signature comic visual style and stark visual palette. While it deals with a heavy character background of mental breakdown and abuse, its humour derives from a parody of language and filmic conventions, rather than the serious subject itself. 

The eponymous voices are Ryan Reynolds himself, who voices the psychotic manifestations of Jerry Hickfang, an outwardly cheery, if not amiable average joe. His cat and his dog become his guiding subconscious after a date gone awry that ends with his workplace crush beheaded and living in animated fashion (as part of a delusion of course) in his fridge. Glimpses of his turbulent childhood living with a mentally ill mother, while being ill himself, flesh out the damaging assault by his father, and his alienation within his own family. These moments are tense and frightening—a tonal departure—but nevertheless significant in building a sympathetic character whose violence is necessarily born out of his uncontrollable mind. 

Satrapi also plays very well with the concept of perception—portraying subjective (through Jerry’s eyes) and objective settings, and perhaps even subjective and objective personalities. Although, the story perpetuates a harmful stereotype of violent behaviour among those who live with mental disorders (which is simply untrue), he is not absolved of asking philosophical questions about his existence; his tortured existence which has made him unwillingly violent. By the end, with a winning musical number, Jerry is seen as a product of a society that is still reluctant and unsure of how to speak about mental illness. And the reverberations of this means lives suffer, though not nearly in such a zany and redeeming manner as The Voices. 

FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them!

September 15th 2014 1:20 AM  |  3 notes
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So TIFF 2014 is officially over! I still have two more reviews coming up because I sort of fell behind the day I almost got sick. But nonetheless I saw A Second Chance, my last film, and it was a very well written moral drama. 

It was a busy week, but it reaffirmed for myself how much I love film. It doesn’t matter how hectic things get; my reprieve will always be the theatre. 

September 14th 2014 12:26 AM  |  0 notes
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The O’Jays / Sing A Happy Song

Featured in The Voices. It’s an infectious song.

September 13th 2014 11:57 PM  |  7 notes  |  Via
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soundonsight:

TIFF 2014: ‘Two Days, One Night’ another humanizing powerhouse from the Dardennes
Toronto International Film Festival 2014
Sandra (Marion Cotillard) spends the majority of Two Days, One Night knocking on the doors of her co-workers and modestly pleading with them to decline a significant pay bonus so that she can save her job and her family. Some are instantly receptive to her request while others blow her off and even resort to violence. It’s an episodic structure that is executed with measured precision and tension from master Belgian auteurs and critics-darlings Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (The Kid with a Bike). Acting as the antithesis of the hardworking, stubborn, and desperate titular character from the directing duo’s immaculate Rosetta (1999), Sandra’s glowing and unwavering empathy towards those who stand in opposition to her is the crux of her character and the streamlined grace that runs through this humbled marvel of a film.
Click here to expand the article 

In the meantime, here’s a perfect review of one the better films this year. I absolutely loved this masterpiece (yes a cheesy compliment) and this reviewer puts it so eloquently.

soundonsight:

TIFF 2014: ‘Two Days, One Night’ another humanizing powerhouse from the Dardennes

Toronto International Film Festival 2014

Sandra (Marion Cotillard) spends the majority of Two Days, One Night knocking on the doors of her co-workers and modestly pleading with them to decline a significant pay bonus so that she can save her job and her family. Some are instantly receptive to her request while others blow her off and even resort to violence. It’s an episodic structure that is executed with measured precision and tension from master Belgian auteurs and critics-darlings Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (The Kid with a Bike). Acting as the antithesis of the hardworking, stubborn, and desperate titular character from the directing duo’s immaculate Rosetta (1999), Sandra’s glowing and unwavering empathy towards those who stand in opposition to her is the crux of her character and the streamlined grace that runs through this humbled marvel of a film.

Click here to expand the article 

In the meantime, here’s a perfect review of one the better films this year. I absolutely loved this masterpiece (yes a cheesy compliment) and this reviewer puts it so eloquently.

September 13th 2014 11:55 PM  |  1 note
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I’d appreciate it if people reblog or at least like that review. I think it’s one of my more substantial reviews haha so I’d appreciate if more people read it and maybe even sparked some discussion. Films that are polarizing are often the site of contentious debate and this is definitely one of them this year.