ABOUT ME
Neurotic Visionary with Delusional Aspirations. 08/20/1995. Male. Canada. Or am I?

#MY FACE

#MY ART

#MY REVIEWS
March 19th 2014 9:51 PM  |  19 notes  |  Via
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filmhabits:

Peanuts - Teaser Trailer

In theaters November 6, 2015 (US)

On a happier note, this teaser trailer for a far off Peanuts film is absolutely adorable :)

March 14th 2014 11:47 PM  |  21 notes
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The Grand Budapest Hotel, dir. Wes Anderson (2014)
Wes Anderson’s singular vision and stylistic form is in full force and arguably at its best in The Grand Budapest Hotel. Brimming with whimsy and drama, this is no less of a trademark Anderson full-length feature film. A young woman reads the novel of The Grand Budapest Hotel at the foot of the author’s gravestone, and it is the Young Writer (perhaps from beyond the grave) who narrates his encounter with Zero Moustafa, whom consequently retells his young life as lobby boy for the legendary Monsieur Gustave—who leads him on an adventure on the run, testing their loyalty, or more accurately, rather proving their indomitable loyalty.
Amongst this quirky chase is a backdrop of war tensions and immigration policies, but with such an enormous all-star cast and plenty of eccentric characters, the stories of the characters seem to waver, never quite developing strongly, in the midst of the high energy, seemingly endless, criminal pursuit—that is no doubt filled with peculiar Andersonian humour. 
So while The Grand Budapest is visually stunning, cinematically impeccable, and one of Anderson’s more suspense driven films (crime! murder! decapitation! high-speed chases!), it can’t entirely make up for the lack of nuance and emotional sentiment. It is, otherwise, utterly fun and compelling narration on the part of Anderson’s exceptional directorial artistry.
FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them! 

The Grand Budapest Hotel, dir. Wes Anderson (2014)

Wes Anderson’s singular vision and stylistic form is in full force and arguably at its best in The Grand Budapest Hotel. Brimming with whimsy and drama, this is no less of a trademark Anderson full-length feature film. A young woman reads the novel of The Grand Budapest Hotel at the foot of the author’s gravestone, and it is the Young Writer (perhaps from beyond the grave) who narrates his encounter with Zero Moustafa, whom consequently retells his young life as lobby boy for the legendary Monsieur Gustave—who leads him on an adventure on the run, testing their loyalty, or more accurately, rather proving their indomitable loyalty.

Amongst this quirky chase is a backdrop of war tensions and immigration policies, but with such an enormous all-star cast and plenty of eccentric characters, the stories of the characters seem to waver, never quite developing strongly, in the midst of the high energy, seemingly endless, criminal pursuit—that is no doubt filled with peculiar Andersonian humour. 

So while The Grand Budapest is visually stunning, cinematically impeccable, and one of Anderson’s more suspense driven films (crime! murder! decapitation! high-speed chases!), it can’t entirely make up for the lack of nuance and emotional sentiment. It is, otherwise, utterly fun and compelling narration on the part of Anderson’s exceptional directorial artistry.

FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them! 

March 14th 2014 11:03 PM  |  4 notes
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Orlando, dir. Sally Potter (1992)
“Same person. No difference at all… just a different sex.”
Swinton’s soft spoken, assured deliverance defines a graceful and one-of-a-kind androgynous performance that accentuates the versatility of a truly powerful actress. Orlando is a succinct, beautifully told story, perhaps a quiet epic, of a man who lives for four hundred years, and somewhere along the way, becomes a woman. There are no convoluted technicalities or biological accuracies to scrutinize; Potter’s Orlando is a soulful story that is merely human in nature and peeks through the political, social, and emotional, stained glass of womanhood, and the ways in which society prejudices and distinguishes the sexes. 
Orlando is, at a visceral level, a simple narrative—as well as being aesthetically outstanding, in its ornate costuming and lavish sets—and may seem facile or reductive, but within the parallels lies the complexity and constructed dichotomy of gender in history and today. Potter’s lens is completely unpretentious, and also undoubtedly feminist. Orlando is an understated study of sex and gender.
FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them!

Orlando, dir. Sally Potter (1992)

Same person. No difference at all… just a different sex.”

Swinton’s soft spoken, assured deliverance defines a graceful and one-of-a-kind androgynous performance that accentuates the versatility of a truly powerful actress. Orlando is a succinct, beautifully told story, perhaps a quiet epic, of a man who lives for four hundred years, and somewhere along the way, becomes a woman. There are no convoluted technicalities or biological accuracies to scrutinize; Potter’s Orlando is a soulful story that is merely human in nature and peeks through the political, social, and emotional, stained glass of womanhood, and the ways in which society prejudices and distinguishes the sexes. 

Orlando is, at a visceral level, a simple narrative—as well as being aesthetically outstanding, in its ornate costuming and lavish sets—and may seem facile or reductive, but within the parallels lies the complexity and constructed dichotomy of gender in history and today. Potter’s lens is completely unpretentious, and also undoubtedly feminist. Orlando is an understated study of sex and gender.

FILMS IN 2014 for quick reviews and ratings of films, as I watch them!

March 8th 2014 12:31 AM  |  3 notes
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FILMS IN 2014

13. Wadjda (2013)

This story of a young girl’s tenacity and determination to ride a bike in her hometown, is a story about the morals that divide women in how they see themselves within their society. It’s perhaps simplistic, but it tells an important story from an important perspective—the child, the girl, who’s burgeoning understanding of the world she lives in is informed by the women around her. 

14. Nebraska (2013)

Sweetly funny film about Woody Grant, an old man who believes he’s won a million dollars—but with or without the money, can’t say no to helping everyone with all of his heart, even if his kindness hides underneath a stoic, old man, exterior. Nebraska has the same sense of familiarity and family values of The Descendants.

15. Rio Bravo (1959)

Although I missed half an hour of the beginning (I’m terribly tired all the time and the dim lights of my cinema class don’t exactly help), this lengthy Western had some comedic highlights in its latter three quarters. We can observe the conventions of the Western that are built and also subverted in this film, but that kind of critical reading still left me mostly unamused. I suppose the Western satisfies a niche audience.  

16. North by Northwest (1959)

Again, I missed the first half an hour of the film, but North by Northwest maintains as a classic spy and chase film by Hitchcock that remains entertaining in the 21st century. Hitchcock’s aesthetic is still iconic and inimitable—the extreme aerial shots, Saul Bass’s illustrious graphic titles, and his mastery of suspense.

February 22nd 2014 12:00 AM  |  19 notes
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"I think deep down inside, people understand how flawed they are. I think the more benign you make somebody, the less truthful it is."

—  Philip Seymour Hoffman
February 17th 2014 9:36 PM  |  0 notes
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FILMS IN 2014

9. Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Nearly 80 years old, and Hawks’s films still stand the test of time. His classic comedies, with wonderful leading ladies such as the electric performance by Katharine Hepburn here, are easy to view; even if at times they don’t present anything more than entertaining. 

10. Children of Men (2005)

Cuaron’s imagining of a dystopia where a worldwide pandemic of infertility has stalled the human race, is in one word terrifying, but also absolutely complex and thrilling. It paints the desolation and inhumanity that spawns—when there is no one left to carry out the future, who do we live for? Who do we save our humanity and our peace for? When death is the ultimate end without consequence, death and terrorism is no longer bound by the same motives or trepidations. But Cuaron reminds us of the beauty of hope. How new life reinvigorates and inspires; figuratively and literally. We see the possibilities and potential in our younger generation, but Children of Men suggests that our own faith and actions are just as powerful. We can reimagine ourselves as having just as much potential for peace and change as those in their infancy. Cuaron is a master of crafting sets and environments that incites questions that are political, cultural, and social. His distinct direction and storytelling is impeccable and effective here. 

11. Women on The Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (1988)

Almodovar’s melodrama’s are timeless classics. Nervous Breakdown is a fast paced Spanish comedy, full of wonderfully insane women vacillating between aversion and attraction to the single man that brings these women together in war. This being my first viewing of Almodovar’s earlier works (I had previously seen Volver and Bad Education—both of which are fantastic, brooding mysteries), I look forward to the rest of his filmography, from the past and in the future.

12. The Lego Movie (2014)

The elegance and sentimentality of The Lego Movie alone, has me overlooking the fact that it’s purely a kid’s film (with no doubt, a kid’s sense of humour). Naturally, the screenwriters capitalized on why Lego is loved and what the brand stands for—its inspiration of creation and infinite possibility. They run with this thematically, and with all the potential to be crazy and fun, the result is a film that sends an important message to everybody on this planet; realize that your individuality is valuable and harness what it means to be yourself. Perhaps it’s a lofty and facile statement to proclaim to adults, but for kids who see this film, it hopefully inspires a world of innovators and self-fulfilled prophets. 

February 15th 2014 8:30 PM  |  8 notes
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"For us, for many reasons having her emerge from the lake was very important, because it’s a movie about rebirth, but also about life."

"Not unlike the Darwinian graph, from that murky lake, she crawls into the mud like a reptile. And then she goes on four legs. And finally goes on two legs, but still in a curve. To finally erect herself in a new life."

Gravity (2013) dir. Alfonso Cuarón

February 15th 2014 6:51 PM  |  3 notes
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"Jonás and I, we were discussing about the possibility of doing this kind of an edge-of-your-seat experience. This thing, which is so tense, so suspenseful, the audience experience becomes more a visceral experience, almost a more primal experience. And by doing that, the audience would fill the blanks. The audience would embed their own emotional experience into the journey of our characters."

—  

Alfonso Cuarón, on the writing of Gravity

Gravity’s symbolic imagery, its visual landscape infused with thematic metaphors, rather than heavy dialogue filled with rhetoric or narrative complexity, accomplishes what Cuarón and his son set out to do. It reaches out to its audience, and compels them to project themselves and their adversities into the void of space that these characters drift in.

February 7th 2014 10:28 PM  |  30 notes  |  Via
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cinematicshadows:

The Lego Movie was supposed to be a blatant product advertisement that demonstrated how capitalism interferes with the entertainment industry. Instead, it’s subversive, satiric, bitingly self-aware, and an absolute blast. What could’ve been delegated as a children’s tale turns into a wonderfully realized adventure that challenges every notion of adventure films, distorting the reality of superheroes, supervillains, and LEGOs themselves. The movie follows Emmet (voice of Chris Pratt), who is destined to be the builder that saves the world from the destruction of Lord/President Business (voice of Will Ferrell), as he works with master builders voiced by the likes of Elizabeth Banks and Morgan Freeman to save the day. Oh yeah, and Batman’s here too. The movie works without knowing much about the many surprises in store, since they’re hilarious and produce laughs out of situations I could have never imagined. Yet the movie’s also remarkably touching in its final half hour and provides a strong metaphor about creation, childhood, and joy. It’s such a shocking piece of artistic craft that none of us saw coming. The Lego Movie is the children’s movie that seems destined to challenge all children’s movies. 
Grade: ★★★★½ (out of 5)
See my full video review right HERE.

Do we already have a strong contender for best animated film of the year? This early? Perhaps so :)

cinematicshadows:

The Lego Movie was supposed to be a blatant product advertisement that demonstrated how capitalism interferes with the entertainment industry. Instead, it’s subversive, satiric, bitingly self-aware, and an absolute blast. What could’ve been delegated as a children’s tale turns into a wonderfully realized adventure that challenges every notion of adventure films, distorting the reality of superheroes, supervillains, and LEGOs themselves. The movie follows Emmet (voice of Chris Pratt), who is destined to be the builder that saves the world from the destruction of Lord/President Business (voice of Will Ferrell), as he works with master builders voiced by the likes of Elizabeth Banks and Morgan Freeman to save the day. Oh yeah, and Batman’s here too. The movie works without knowing much about the many surprises in store, since they’re hilarious and produce laughs out of situations I could have never imagined. Yet the movie’s also remarkably touching in its final half hour and provides a strong metaphor about creation, childhood, and joy. It’s such a shocking piece of artistic craft that none of us saw coming. The Lego Movie is the children’s movie that seems destined to challenge all children’s movies. 

Grade: ★★★½ (out of 5)

See my full video review right HERE.

Do we already have a strong contender for best animated film of the year? This early? Perhaps so :)

February 7th 2014 12:24 PM  |  1 note
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Children of Men warrants a couple of more viewings, because I certainly have some questions, but I don’t think i have the time and thought I’d incite some conversation on tumblr, if anyone else has seen it.

Why did The Fishes want to keep Kee’s baby for themselves? Was is it so that they could abuse the child, in hopes of having it reproduce more offspring? But they also feared that the government would genetically experiment with the child, which they claimed to be against. Keeping it merely as a symbol for a revolution against the oppressive government doesn’t seem like it would benefit many people or even succeed… but…

The ending leaves us on a cliffhanger, without knowing whether The Human Project can indeed cure infertility, but I don’t understand the intentions of The Fishes…